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Get Your Rear in Gear: What should I wear on race day?

Friday, July 29, 2016

By: Femi Cole



The second annual Get Your Rear in Gear 5K run/walk is next week. By now you should be pretty well trained and raring to go.

 

GYRIG what to wear

 

But if your training isn’t quite there yet, don’t fret. There’s still lots you can do to prepare yourself for the event, which is at 9 a.m. Saturday, Aug. 6.

 

In the meantime, here’s some advice from Laura Grovogel, a fitness and nutrition expert at Aurora BayCare Sports Medicine Fitness Center, on how to at least look prepared on race day:

 

Shoes: If you buy shoes for your first 5K run/walk, make sure you break them in by putting them through several training sessions. It sounds like a no-brainer, but it’s not uncommon for newbies to wear their new kicks on race day. In most cases, that turns what should have been a positive and fulfilling race into a miserable experience, thanks to chafing and blisters. Oh, and if you do plan to buy a new pair of running shoes for the 5K, hit the store later in the day. Your feet can expand a half size through the course of a day.

 

Attire: It’s a good recommendation to wear clothing that has worked well for you during your training runs. Generally, you should wear whatever you think you’ll feel most comfortable in 10 minutes after the start of the race. New running attire (including that free T-shirt in your race-day packet) usually can benefit from a trip through the laundry. Throwing on a new T-shirt and shorts for your 5K run/walk could have you focusing less on the exciting race experience and more on your chafed body parts. You don’t want that.

 

Gear: Runners, like any other people, are unique. Some show up for race day looking like the road race veterans that they are – runner’s belt, watch with heart rate monitor, GPS, shades with polarized lenses – and others look like they’re simply delighted to be a part of the day’s activities. As long as you’re enjoying your race day experience, whatever gear you opt to use is entirely up to you. However, here are a few basic suggestions:

 

  • Sun protection: Use a waterproof, stick-formulation sunscreen. It should have an SPF of at least 15 and given that it’s in stick form, it won’t run into your eyes when you sweat.
  • iPod, MP3player, etc.: Music can power you across the 5K finish line. It’s scientifically proven. A 2010 study found that cyclists worked harder when listening to faster music as compared to music at a slower tempo.
  • Running cap: A running cap is excellent UV protection for your head. Don a cap (brim forward) and offer your eyes additional protection from the sun.

 

Bib: don’t forget to attach your race bib to the front of your T-shirt where it clearly can be seen by race officials. Safety pins are included in your race packet. Bibs help organizers tell the difference between the hundreds of registrants on race day and play a vital role in recording finishing times.

 

Most importantly, have fun. No matter what you wear or what gear you bring along to aid your run/walk experience, have a great time doing it.

 

The second annual Get Your Rear in Gear-Green Bay presented by Aurora BayCare Medical Center is scheduled for 9 a.m. on Saturday, Aug. 6. It offers a timed 5K race and a 1.5-mile walk. The race will carry runners and walkers from Aurora BayCare Medical Center, through the surrounding neighborhoods and back to the start/finish line on the hospital campus. Race organizers expect around 200 registrants.

 

The event is an effort to raise awareness of colon cancer and better educate the public about the importance of appropriate screenings and early detection. It’s a program of the Colon Cancer Coalition, a Minneapolis-based group that promotes national awareness of colon cancer and encourages increased use of screenings.

 

Aurora BayCare Medical Center is the event’s presenting sponsor.

 

Registration is $25 for adults and $15 for ages 12 and under through August 3, then $30 for adults and $20 for ages 12 and under from August 4 to race day. The kids’ fun run is $15.

 

Related Providers:


Johnson Erik

Erik Johnson, MD, FACS, is Board Certified  in general surgery and in colon and rectal surgery, and practices at Aurora BayCare Medical Center.  Dr. Johnson received his education at the Medical College of Wisconsin in Milwaukee and completed two fellowships, one at Ferguson Clinic in colorectal and one at the University of Wisconsin Hospital and Clinics in oncology. Learn more here.  

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BayCare Clinic, baycare.net, is the largest physician-owned specialty-care clinic in northeastern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It is based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. BayCare Clinic offers expertise in more than 20 specialties, with more than 100 physicians serving in 16 area communities. BayCare Clinic is a joint partner in Aurora BayCare Medical Center, a 167-bed, full-service hospital. Follow BayCare Clinic on Facebook and Twitter.