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Farmers markets are back! What you’ll find

Wednesday, July 1, 2020

By: Jeff Ash


Containers of fresh raspberries at a farmers market.

In a year when so much hasn’t happened as expected, Wisconsin’s growing season arrived as it does every year. That’s great news for those who love farmers markets.

 

When you’re at the Saturday farmers market at its new location in downtown Green Bay, follow this year’s guidelines to help slow the spread of the COVID-19 virus:

 

  • Grab one of our BayCare Clinic shopping bags. Don’t bring reusable bags from home.
  • Shop alone, or with as few people as possible.
  • Don’t bring children if you have childcare available.
  • Maintain social distancing. Stay 6 feet from other shoppers and vendors.
  • Don’t touch fruits and vegetables. Point to what you want. Let the vendor handle it.
  • Wear a face mask. Vendors and market staff will be wearing theirs.
  • Use hand sanitizer or the hand-washing stations frequently.
  • Stay home if you’re sick.

Here’s a brief guide to what you’re likely to find freshest at Wisconsin farmers markets from July through October.

 

Fruit

  • July: Blueberries, sweet cherries, melons, raspberries, tart cherries, apples
  • August: Apples, blueberries, melons, pears, raspberries, grapes
  • September: Apples, cranberries, raspberries, grapes, pears
  • October: Raspberries, apples, cranberries

Vegetables

  • July: Arugula, beans, beets, bok choy, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, kale and collards, kohlrabi, leaf lettuce, okra, onions, sweet peas, bell peppers, potatoes, salad mix, scallions, summer squash, tomatillos, tomatoes, turnips
  • August: Arugula, beans, beets, bok choy, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, garlic, kale and collards, kohlrabi, leeks, okra, onions, bell peppers, hot peppers, potatoes, salad mix, scallions, summer squash, winter squash, tomatillos, tomatoes
  • September: Arugula, beans, beets, bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, corn, cucumbers, eggplant, kale and collards, kohlrabi, leeks, okra, onions, bell peppers, hot peppers, potatoes, radishes, rutabagas, salad mix, scallions, spinach, summer squash, winter squash, tomatillos, tomatoes
  • October: Arugula, beets, bok choy, broccoli, brussels sprouts, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, chard, cucumbers, eggplant, kale and collards, kohlrabi, leaf lettuce, leeks, parsnips, bell peppers, potatoes, radishes, rutabagas, salad mix, scallions, spinach, winter squash, tomatillos, tomatoes, turnips

Here’s a guide to the full year in PDF form.

 

Source: The Center for Integrated Agricultural Systems, College of Agricultural and Life Sciences. University of Wisconsin-Madison.

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BayCare Clinic, baycare.net, is the largest physician-owned specialty-care clinic in northeastern Wisconsin and Michigan’s Upper Peninsula. It is based in Green Bay, Wisconsin. BayCare Clinic offers expertise in more than 20 specialties, with more than 100 physicians serving in 16 area communities. BayCare Clinic is a joint partner in Aurora BayCare Medical Center, a 167-bed, full-service hospital. Follow BayCare Clinic on Facebook and Twitter.